Walking in Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons & Self Catering Nearby

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Walking in Mid Wales and Brecon Beacons & Self Catering Nearby


Offa's Dyke Path National Trail and self catering accommodation nearby...

The Offa's Dyke Path National Trail follows the Welsh/English border for 177 miles (285km) from Sedbury Cliff, near Chepstow in the south to the seafront at Prestatyn in the north. This long distance trail is way marked using the white acorn symbol and offers superb views and some steep gradients – so always be properly prepared.

The Severn Way and self catering accommodation nearby...

The Severn Way is the longest river walk in Britain, tracing the 210 miles of the River Severn (Afon Hafren in Welsh) from its source at Plynlimon (Pumlumon) to the sea at Bristol. This waymarked route passes through some beautiful countryside, lovely villages, castle towns, market centers and cathedral cities as it follows longest river in the British Isles.

Dyfi Valley Way and self catering accommodation nearby...

The Dyfi Valley Way in Mid Wales is a long distance footpath running through one of the most beautiful valleys in Wales. This route follows the River Dyfi from the estuary in Aberdyfi to the source at the summit of Aran Fawddwy, which at 2,971ft is the highest peak south of Snowdon. The route then goes back down along the south side of the river via Machynlleth and down to Borth.

Walking in Builth Wells and self catering accommodation nearby...

There are many great walks in the Builth Wells Area. The nearby Cambrian Mountains are ideal both for those who like a quiet leisurely stroll or for those who wish to undertake longer rambles on day treks. The views across the rolling hills are just fantastic.

Glyndwr's Way National Trail and self catering accommodation nearby...

Glyndwr's Way is a long distance footpath in Mid Wales that was granted National Trail status in the year 2000. Its enigmatic name derives from the early fifteenth century Welsh prince and folk hero Owain Glyndŵr, who won significant battles close to the route and who held a Welsh Parliament in Machynlleth.

 
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