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Glyndwr's Way National Trail

Glyndwr's Way is a long distance footpath in Mid Wales that was granted National Trail status in the year 2000. Its enigmatic name derives from the early fifteenth century Welsh prince and folk hero Owain Glyndŵr, who won significant battles close to the route and who held a Welsh Parliament in Machynlleth.

The 135m/217km Trail is a long distance walk which can be enjoyed as a continuous journey, typically taking around nine days,  or over a series of weekend or day trips.  It begins at Knighton on the English border and meanders through the open moorland, rolling farmland, woodland and forest of Mid Wales, through the town of Machynlleth, which was the capital of Wales in 1404, finishing by the Montgomeryshire Canal in Welshpool.  Here Glyndŵr's Way is about three miles from  Offa's Dyke Path National Trail, which can be followed all the way back to Knighton, adding about 30 miles to the walk.

Along the Trail are some of the finest landscape features in Wales including the tranquil Radnorshire Hills, the shores of the Clywedog Reservoir and heather clad Plynlimon.  There are spectacular views over Cadair Idris, Lake Vyrnwy, the Cambrian Mountains and Y Golfa.  The route reaches its highest point at Foel Fadian (1530ft/510m) from which on a clear day views stretch out along the majestic Dulas valley to Machynlleth and the sea.

The National Trail has been developed primarily for walkers, although there are sections suitable for horses and cyclists. However, Glyndŵr's Way is not suitable for use as a long distance bridleway or cycle route.